Studio Monitors: What matters most in the recording studio?

Miami Recording Studio, Mixing - March 25, 2016, at 6:54 pm

 

When listening in a room with multiple monitors such as these, there are many options and techniques that can be used depending on the needs of the recording engineer. The ADAM S2X monitors are very transparent and provide a realistic perspective of your mix. In the Fishtank recording studio, we pair those with our KRK 10" Sub to simulate the "wall of sound" and when switching to the other monitors the sub is removed. This makes them ideal for working with panning and depth in your mix as opposed to the other monitors in our studio. In comparison, the Genelec monitors have a more rounded frequency range and are used without the sub to provide a mix quality sound for referencing. These work great for mixing bass because you can check the presence of your mid range frequencies in a monitor where all the frequencies are combined and then switch back to your main speakers. We use the Yamaha NS-10 monitors to reference our mid and high range frequencies without the sub. These vintage monitors provide an ultra clear and present sound that is a bit harsh at first but very useful in hearing the subtle details of your source. I like to use these for referencing guitars, vocals, and overheads without the sub because they allow me to hear the full timbre of the instrument and determine which frequencies I want to adjust in my EQ. If I had to pick one of these pairs as my favorite, it would be the ADAM S2X Monitors because their sound quality is unmatched compared to the other two and they have a handy EQ on the front of the speaker which makes for easy adjustments on the fly.