Miami Recording Studio

April 6, 2015

The Importance of Being Prepared

Although working in the studio can be a lot of fun, it is also a lot of hard work. Specially when you’re literally paying for each minute that passes by. One of the biggest mistakes artists make before coming into the studio, is to not have a CRYSTAL-CLEAR vision of waht they want their product to sound like. I have seen this happen time-and-time again, regardless of the genre of music, etc. If you, as an artist/producer/musician, don’t have a good idea of what you want your end result to sound like, chances are the engineer won’t either. Do your homework by warming up at home, going over each part of your recording, have lyrics, chords changes, rhythm notes all written down so as to not waste time, which as we all know, time =MONEY. Our recording engineers and first class facilities can polish your work into something formidable, if and only if you have put the time into crafting your music. For more information, tips, and tricks, book a session at Fish Tank’s [intlink id=”7″ type=”page”]Miami recording studio[/intlink].
March 31, 2016

Our techniques for recording electric guitar

Without question, the electric guitar is at the heart of todays musical arrangements across all genres. Polished pop, indie rock, nu-metal, singer songwriter, country, jazz, and even hip hop employ electric guitars to bolster their arrangements. There is such a breadth of tone and style that can be produced with the electric guitar that it seems like their would be an infinite number of methods to record it. First and foremost it is helpful to think of the electric guitar as an electric instrument, generating current at the pickups, and amplified in several different ways. Most often, the signal is amplified by a big honking amplifier! Guitar amplifiers and cabinets come in all shapes and sizes, and offer the ability to take the signal and tone generated at the pickups, and mold them with more tonality, distortion, and warmth. Further, the speaker in an amplifier colors the sound through the natural compression of the cone as it creates compressions and rarefactions that transmit sound through the air. Proper choice and placement of a microphone dictate the tonality of what is captured. Microphone Choice and Placement   Due to high SPL (how loud an amplifier can get) many condenser microphones tend to be too sensitive for very close proximity recording of the speaker. For this reason, dynamic microphones like the famed Shure SM57 or Sennheiser MD421 are used in this up close and personal capture of the amp. Tonality (think EQ) can be garnered from choosing how the microphone is directed at […]
July 8, 2016

Recording studio Miami: How to choose a recording studio

    What would you recommend that people look for in a recording studio?   Aside from the engineer, I think, believe it or not the acoustics of the environment are perhaps more important than the actual equipment, although the equipment is important. Basically, you want to be creating in a room that is accurate, so that what you’re recording and what you hear actually translates everywhere else. You're recording something, for example, at your homeboys' studio and it sounds great and you throw it in the car and it’s like, it didn’t sound like this at all. There are usually reasons why the acoustics of the room can throw things off completely, where you'll have standing waves and reflections and things that that make your mix and your recording sound good, when in fact those are phantom sort of sounds and they’re not really there. The accuracy of the room is critical.   After that would be the equipment. Now more than at any other point in time you can do a lot with a couple thousand dollars worth of equipment you can great sounds. Back 10, 15 years ago there were quarter of a million dollar consoles, really super expensive digital recorders that were sometimes up to half a million dollars. Now you can get awesome conversion great pre-amps at reasonable prices. The gear is important, it certainly is, but obviously the engineer needs to know how to get the most out of the equipment. I would say […]
April 7, 2016

Acoustic treatment of our live tracking room

So as the owner of the Fish Tank recording studios here in Miami, I am very particular about the quality of sound being captured in our live room. I am also aware that the look and feel of the live room needs to be such that we can set the right vibe for our clients. Great looking, bleeding edge acoustic treatment, that is affordable, is incredibly hard to come by. The entry level home studio gets egg crate auralex foam. Nothing wrong with that, but it does not treat anything other than some high frequency reflections. No bass management or diffusion. The next step up would be the serious home or project studio that uses panels and bass traps from the likes of GIK acoustics, Realtraps, RPG, and a hand full of ready made products. When looking to take things to the next level, the studio owner must look for custom solutions, which uniquely suit the room. Treatment that is custom made for the room, is not inexpensive. Framing and stretching fabric using the track systems found in large commercial studios can can cost upwards of $10,000 for a modest control room. I had my last control room treated professionally, and it is very hard to accept anything less for the new rooms. I have been curious about stretching fabric, and have decided to start with the most difficult area to treat: the ceiling! We will begin treating the ceiling with the assistance of Victor Rakovich from Mainstay Materials, our supplier for […]